Audacity by Melanie Crowder

 

A book review by Madeline Soucie

 

This story is based on the life of Clara Lemlick, a Russian Jewish immigrant who grew up in Russia and then moved with her family to America on the East Side of New York in the early 1900s. Clara worked in a cloth factory in horrible conditions for little pay to help support her family. Her working conditions inspired her to fight for improvement of work conditions for women and never gave up despite the challenges she faced.

Though this is historical fiction, it is based on true events and gives a little bit of an insight of how immigrants worked and lived when they first entered the country in the old days.

 

Find it in APL TEEN Fiction YA FIC Crowder, M.

Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Perez

A huge explosion in New London in 1937 opens this story, which then flashes back to Naomi, a Mexican, and Wash, a Negro, who have fallen in love in a time of deep segregation. No one in this town can cross the racial barriers.  This work of historical fiction is “A powerful, layered tale of forbidden love in times of unrelenting racism.” (author’s note taken from Kirkus Reviews)

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans by Don Brown

This book revisits Hurricane Katrina in graphic novel format.  Its style will appeal to all audiences – children, teens and adults.  The excellent writing and high quality artwork captures both the devastation caused by this disaster and the human responsibility necessary for recovery.  Additionally, the book also captures the triumph of New Orleans through its cleanup and rebuilding.

The Accident Season by Moira Fowley-Doyle

Each fall, Cara’s family enters the accident season – a time when they all become terribly accident-prone .  The rest of the year, her family is just like any other family.  Some years are worse than others, and this year may be the worst one yet.  But Cara, Sam (her ex-step brother), and her best friend Bea are going to try to solve the mystery of the accident season for once and for all.

Not After Everything by Michelle Levy

Tyler has everything going for him – he’s popular, a football star with a hot girlfriend, headed to a good college – until his mother commits suicide the summer before his senior year.  After that, he lets everything go and shuts himself off.   When his childhood friend, Jordyn, comes back into his life she offers him some solace and her love. Can Tyler open himself up to her and find happiness again?  This is a very raw, and – at times difficult – read and deals with issues of abuse which can be graphic and unrelenting.  That being said, it is also powerful and unforgettable.

The Fellowship of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien

A book review by Faith Thompson

 

The deadly Ringwraiths are searching for a hobbit — Frodo Baggins. They want what he carries: The Ring of Power, which will enable the Dark Lord Sauron, its creator, to reclaim his rule. If Sauron recovers his Ring, all will be lost.

Battling Orcs, greedy men, and the Wraiths themselves — and aided by his gardener Sam, a wizard named Gandalf, and a mysterious Ranger named Aragorn — Frodo makes his painfully slow way across Middle-earth to Mordor, Sauron’s kingdom.  This is the only place where the Ring can be destroyed. Its seduction is so great that no one can wield it. All Frodo can hope for is the Ring’s destruction.

 

Find it in APL TEEN Fiction YA FIC Tolkein, J.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black

A book review by Madeline Soucie        

 

Tana lives in a world where vampires and humans alike are quarantined in cities surrounded by walls called Coldtowns. Once you get into a Coldtown — whether or not you want to be there — there is no getting out.  Good luck surviving  on the inside!

After going to a party one night Tana wakes up in a house full of dead bodies with no idea what happened. Upon exploration she finds her friend/ex-boyfriend tied to a bed and infected and a mysterious new boy chained in the corner. Tana takes it upon herself to free her friend and the mysterious boy and together the three of them make the journey to the nearest Coldtown to admit themselves before they get into serious trouble.

 

Find it in APL TEEN Fiction YA FIC Black, H.

Teen Summer Reading Wrap Up

The 2015 Teen Summer Reading Program — “Unmask!” — wrapped up recently here at the Auburn Public Library.  It was a busy summer with lots of reading and great programs to go along with it!

With heroes as our theme, our book displays and activities turned the teens’ attention to  local heroes, national heroes and superheroes.

We kicked off the program on June 23rd with the Greater Androscoggin Humane Society. Sandy Graul, some of her volunteers and a few lionhead rabbits joined us.  Sandy talked a bit about the work they do to help the animals — within the county, the State and in other states as well.  GAHS are truly local heroes to those animals!

In July, we turned our focus to superheroes.  Local comic book artist Mike Jordan led a two-session workshop.  The end result was a new edition of APL Presents.

We wrapped up the 2015 Summer Reading Program with an amazing visit and talk by Luis Carlos Montalvan and his service dog, Tuesday. We were lucky enough to have Laurie St. Pierre and Russ Dillingham of the Sun Journal and Rob Nesbitt from WCSH join Capt. Montalvan and Tuesday during their visit.  If you weren’t able to join us, details of his visit are available on the Sun Journal’s archive page (“In Dog He Trusts”) or on wcsh6.com.  Click here to view that clip.

We had 69 teens participate this summer, an increase of nearly 20% from the past two summers.  Among them, they read nearly 500 books!  We gave out over 30 prizes, ranging from free Chill Zone beverages at Cumberland Farms, $5 gift cards to Top It Frozen Yogurt, certificates for free Italian sandwiches at Sam’s, $10 gift cards to Books a Million and $20 gift cards to local businesses.

There were also “grab bag” prizes awarded for participating in various activities both here at the Library and in the community.  Some of those activities — attend a different teen program at APL, attend a community event, read 50 pages from a different genre, perform a random act of kindness or read to a child.

Our top reader of the summer was Faith Thompson, and she was the winner of the Kindle paperwhite.  Other finale winners included Crystle Cloutier ($50 gift certificate to Bull Moose Music), Addie Suckow ($50 gift certificate to the Auburn Mall), and Addie Landre (pizza party and movie in the Library).

Thank you to our sponsors this summer:  Cumberland Farms (Center Street), Top It Frozen Yogurt Bar, Sam’s Italian Foods (Center Street), Hannaford (Spring Street), Center Street Dental, Best Buy, and the Portland Sea Dogs.

We are already thinking about and looking forward to summer 2016, when teens will “Get In The Game” at APL!

 

 

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

A book review by Faith Thompson

 

Liesel Meminger has no idea what home is. Her mother is giving her up, and on the train ride to meet her new family, her brother dies suddenly. In the snow by his grave, Liesel discovers a book, half-buried: The Grave Digger’s Handbook. Her foster father teaches her to read, and suddenly all kinds of doors are opening wide to her.

In this book, told interestingly and narrated by Death, we see that even in Nazi Germany, some good still shines through, as a family who was supposed to be part of the Party and fight for Hitler hides a Jew, revolts against book burnings, and loves one another. Liesel and her friend Rudy do some questionable stuff, but all in all I think this is a good book that we can learn a lot from.

 

Find it in APL TEEN Fiction YA FIC Zusak, M.

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