Read ME A statewide summer reading program with a Maine twist

Read ME is a new statewide summer reading program that gets Maine’s adults all reading the same books—by Maine authors and recommended by a Maine author Monica Wood. It’s so easy, you can’t NOT do it!

Come into the Auburn Public Library and grab a copy of either The Moth: 50 True Stories or Unknown Caller and join the statewide program. All participants will be able to attend a special event finale in August.

 

Monica’s picks (and why she picked ’em)

FICTION: Unknown Caller by Debra Spark

Price: $15.75

Unknown Caller book cover“I was up all night with this riveting, gorgeously written novel about a married couple, an unpredictable ex-wife, and a recently discovered daughter. Spark tells their story in reverse order, each chapter revealing layers of insight and intrigue as we backtrack through a complex constellation of relationships. No one I know writes with more depth and empathy about marriage and family. Her emotional intelligence is astounding.”

 

NONFICTION: The Moth: 50 True Stories

Price: $11.20
The Moth 50 True Stories book cover“Originally presented live without notes, the stories in The Moth span the breadth of human experience. A cardiac emergency in a stuck elevator. A famous rap artist saved from despair by music far outside his sphere. A difficult adoption story that finds rest and resolution in Maine. By turns poignant and comical, tragic and triumphant, these stories, told mostly by ordinary folks, made me feel less alone in this huge world. I hope this book choice will inspire “Moth nights” all over Maine, because we Mainers are born storytellers.”

Presented in partnership with the Maine State Library

Summer Reading Program for Adults

It’s time to prepare for the 2017 Summer Reading Program! This year’s theme is “Build a Better World”, which starts with YOU. Use a BINGO card to guide you during the summer challenge, and if you complete all the tasks in a single row or column you will be rewarded!

Pick up a Bingo card on the second floor, or print one out here:

Build a Better World Bingo Card

Entries must be shown to second floor staff by August 10th to collect a prize.

The challenge begins on June 26th.

Page Turners book discussion June 5

The Auburn Page Turners welcome all to come and share their thoughts on the novel News of the World. 

It is 1870 and Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through northern Texas, giving live readings to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. An elderly widower who has lived through three wars and fought in two of them, the captain enjoys his rootless, solitary existence.

In Wichita Falls, he is offered a $50 gold piece to deliver a young orphan to her relatives in San Antonio. Four years earlier, a band of Kiowa raiders killed Johanna’s parents and sister; sparing the little girl, they raised her as one of their own. Recently rescued by the U.S. army, the ten-year-old has once again been torn away from the only home she knows.

Their 400-mile journey south through unsettled territory and unforgiving terrain proves difficult and at times dangerous. Johanna has forgotten the English language, tries to escape at every opportunity, throws away her shoes, and refuses to act “civilized.” Yet as the miles pass, the two lonely survivors tentatively begin to trust each other, forging a bond that marks the difference between life and death in this treacherous land.

Arriving in San Antonio, the reunion is neither happy nor welcome. The captain must hand Johanna over to an aunt and uncle she does not remember—strangers who regard her as an unwanted burden. A respectable man, Captain Kidd is faced with a terrible choice: abandon the girl to her fate or become—in the eyes of the law—a kidnapper himself.

Fun with Physics! May 16

This fun class for adults will look at the basic concepts of motion and force. With the guidance of Hugh Keene, participants will try to figure out why things move the way they do and the force they exert.

Tuesday May 16 at 2PM.

Author Visit: Richard Rubin, May 18

The Auburn Public Library announces their selection by Library of America to receive a World War I and America programming grant.  Authors, historians, veteran advocates, and veterans will lead discussions and share their experiences in veteran affairs and encourage an open dialogue with audience members.

On May 18th at 6 pm, Richard Rubin, author of The Last of the Doughboys and the soon to be released Back Over There, will share from his interviews conducted with veterans as the audience looks at how combat changes lives. Veterans and their families are encouraged to share how the war impacted them both positively or negatively.

Literary Perspectives on Healthcare

The Auburn Public Library has been selected by the Maine Humanities Council to offer “Let’s Talk About It”, a free reading and discussion group with copies of books available through the library.  This program is provided by the Maine Humanities Council’s Maine Center for the Book in cooperation with the Maine State Library.

The series “Exploring Human Boundaries: Literary Perspectives on Health Care Providers and Their Patients, begins at 10:00 am on May 18th at the Auburn Public Library and continues for two additional monthly sessions, ending on July 20th.

Books to be read and discussed in this series include: The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman, The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman, The Diving-Bell and the Butterfly by Jean-Dominique Bauby, and W;t by Margaret Edson.  A scholar provided by the Maine Humanities Council will facilitate the discussions.

 

The sessions will be facilitated by Sara Firth.

Books for the program are available for loan at the library.  Please call the library at 333-6640 Ext. 4 to register and come in to pick up the first book of the series.

Auburn Page Turners meet May 1

Auburn Page Turners will discuss The Boys in the Boat on May 1, at 12:30PM. Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

David Bernier on The Beatles Songbook 4/18

Join David Bernier as he talks about the legendary musical group that took the world by storm. The Beatles are the best-selling band in history, with estimated sales of over 600 million records worldwide. Bernier will take a closer look at some of the Beatles songs and will share insight into the Lennon-McCartney song writing process. Music fans will love this program brought to the Auburn Public Library through a partnership with the Lewiston-Auburn Senior College.

April 18 at 2PM.

Author Visit: Douglas Hodgkin 4/13

Author Douglas Hodgkin will present his newly published full-length biography of Edward Little (1773–1849). Dear Parent: A Biography and Letters of Edward Little, details Little’s early career as a businessman, lawyer, and politician in Newburyport, Massachusetts, until two disasters resulted in massive debt. Little then went to Portland, Maine, to manage the business affairs of his father and of the Pejepscot Proprietors’ land company. Finally, at the age of fifty-three, he settled in Danville, now Auburn,where he founded what became Edward Little High School. Less well known is the role of the Little family in founding a church, bridges, railroads, and the mills at the falls, until the latter were taken over by Boston-based investors. This is the story of a remarkable life. This book also contains the letters that Edward Little addressed to “Dear Parent,” his father, Josiah, that are owned by the Androscoggin Historical Society. They depict the early conditions in the development of the Androscoggin Valley, relations between the Littles and the settlers, and the relations among the Little family themselves. This provides a fascinating look at life in a rural Maine settlement.

About the Author
Douglas I. Hodgkin, a native of Lewiston, Maine, is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Bates College. He is the author of several books about local history, including Lewiston Memories, Historic Lewiston:The Grange at Crowley’s Junction, Frontier to Industrial City: Lewiston Town Politics 1768-1863, The Baptists of Court Street, The Lewiston and Auburn Railroad Company, and Lewiston Politics in the Gilded Age 1863-1900.

April 13 at 2PM

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