Industrial Propaganda and Its Contribution to Fake News, Jan. 14

The Camden Conference presents Marty Gagnon on Tuesday, January 14 at 1pm at the Auburn Public Library. This event is free and open to the public.

Using three industry case standards, this presentation will highlight how big business can make the choice to manipulate the media and contribute to the pool of “Fake News.”

Gagnon, prior to his work in the public library profession, was a journalist for newspapers in Maine and New Hampshire.  In October 2017, Gagnon and a small team from the Auburn Public Library along with Sun Journal Editor Judith Myers traveled to Chicago to participate in a media literacy initiative. The Media Literacy at Your Library was a project of the American Library Association (ALA) in collaboration with many other partners.  The training and interactive workshop featured the curriculum of the Stony Brook University Center for News.

In 2018, Gagnon used the training and his past experiences in the journalism field to create a media literacy and “fake news” class at the Lewiston-Auburn Senior College along with a series of events at the library.  Seeing the amount of interest and general concern for the implications and lack of civil discourse fueled by misinformation, Gagnon created a companion website. The site is non-partisan and takes no advertising and can be viewed at  www.themediasavvycitizen.org.

This event is presented in anticipation of the 33rd Annual Camden Conference—The Media Revolution: Changing the World, February 21-23, 2020, live at the Camden Opera House and livestreamed to the Hutchinson Center in Belfast, Strand Theatre in Rockland, and Hannaford Hall in Portland, and independent streaming site Osher@Dartmouth in Hanover, NH.

The mission of the Camden Conference is to foster informed discourse on world issues. For more information, please visit www.camdenconference.org.

Date:Tuesday Jan 14, 2020

Time:1:00 PM  –  2:00 PM

Location:Androscoggin Community Room

Auburn Page Turners Book Group, Jan. 6

Title to Be Discussed: A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the smash bestseller Orphan Train, a stunning and atmospheric novel of friendship, passion, and art, inspired by Andrew Wyeth’s mysterious and iconic painting Christina’s World.

To Christina Olson, the entire world is her family farm in the small coastal town of Cushing, Maine. The only daughter in a family of sons, Christina is tied to her home by health and circumstance, and seems destined for a small life. Instead, she becomes Andrew Wyeth’s first great inspiration, and the subject of one of the best-known paintings of the twentieth century, Christina’s World.

As she did in her beloved bestseller Orphan Train, Christina Baker Kline interweaves fact and fiction to vividly reimagine a real moment in history. A Piece of the World is a powerful story of the flesh-and-blood woman behind the portrait, her complicated relationship to her family and inheritance, and how artist and muse can come together to forge a new and timeless legacy.Date:Monday Jan 6, 2020Time:12:30 PM  –  1:30 PMLocation:Local History Room

A Look Back Book Group, Jan. 31

A new book group about old times! We will be reading mostly historical fiction about Maine and New England. We meet the final Friday of the month at noon. New members are always welcome.

January 31: Barkskins by Annie Proulx

In New France in the late 18th century, Rene Sel, an illiterate woodsman makes his way from Northern France to the homeland to seek a living. This novel tells stories of Rene’s children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren, as well as the descendants of his friends and foes, as they travel back to Europe, to China, to New England, always in quest of a livelihood or fleeing stunningly brutal conditions–war, pestilence, Indian attacks, the revenge of rivals.

Date:Friday Jan 31, 2020

Time:12:00 PM  –  1:00 PM

Location:Local History Room

Avocado Toast and other Health Claims, Jan. 7

The Camden Conference presents Marty Gagnon on Tuesday, January 7 at 1pm at the Auburn Public Library. This event is free and open to the public.

This presentation will provide an overview of some of the challenges for the reporter and information consumer in assessing the validity of a health report.  The session will look closely at some of the common myths which drive policy on issues such as immigration and vaccination.

Gagnon, prior to his work in the public library profession, was a journalist for newspapers in Maine and New Hampshire.  In October 2017, Gagnon and a small team from the Auburn Public Library along with Sun Journal Editor Judith Myers traveled to Chicago to participate in a media literacy initiative. The Media Literacy at Your Library was a project of the American Library Association (ALA) in collaboration with many other partners.  The training and interactive workshop featured the curriculum of the Stony Brook University Center for News.

In 2018, Gagnon used the training and his past experiences in the journalism field to create a media literacy and “fake news” class at the Lewiston-Auburn Senior College along with a series of events at the library.  Seeing the amount of interest and general concern for the implications and lack of civil discourse fueled by misinformation, Gagnon created a companion website. The site is non-partisan and takes no advertising and can be viewed at  www.themediasavvycitizen.org.

This event is presented in anticipation of the 33rd Annual Camden Conference—The Media Revolution: Changing the World, February 21-23, 2020, live at the Camden Opera House and livestreamed to the Hutchinson Center in Belfast, Strand Theatre in Rockland, and Hannaford Hall in Portland, and independent streaming site Osher@Dartmouth in Hanover, NH.

The mission of the Camden Conference is to foster informed discourse on world issues. For more information, please visit www.camdenconference.org.

Androscoggin Community Room, January 7, 1PM-2PM

Pickwick Club, Dec. 14

The Pickwick Club, Maine’s Dickens and Victorian reading and discussion group, meets at the Auburn Library, our kind sponsor, on Saturday, December 14, from 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Discussion topic: Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield, Chapters 32 – 64. Moderators: Peggy Mower and Alexis DesRoches. FMI call Alexis at (207) 779-8979 or Joanne at (207) 583-6957.Date:Saturday

Dec 14, 2019

Time:12:30 PM  –  2:30 PM

Location:Androscoggin Community Room

Film: The Revenant, Dec.3

If you thought the Maine winters were “wicked”, check out this award winning film at our free “wicked” winter movie series.

Film: The Revenant. While exploring the uncharted wilderness in 1823, frontiersman Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio) sustains life-threatening injuries from a brutal bear attack. When a member (Tom Hardy) of his hunting team kills his young son (Forrest Goodluck) and leaves him for dead, Glass must utilize his survival skills to find a way back to civilization. Grief-stricken and fueled by vengeance, the legendary fur trapper treks through the snowy terrain to track down the man who betrayed him.

Date:Tuesday Dec 3, 2019

Time:12:00 PM  –  2:00 PM

Location:Androscoggin Community Room

4-H Tech Changemakers: Online Shopping, Nov. 22

Come to the Auburn Public Library and gear up for Black Friday Shopping with the 4-H Tech Changemakers. Join the 4-H Changemakers and learn some tips on how to effectively and safely do “Online Shopping.” The National 4?H Council and Microsoft are working together through the 4-H Tech Changemakers program to empower 4-H teens in 91 communities across 15 states to lead digital skills trainings, teach the value of digital tools and find technological solutions to real world problems. They call these tech-savvy and community-oriented young people 4-H Tech Changemakers and they will be here at the Auburn Public Library. 

Date:Friday Nov 22, 2019

Time:1:00 PM  –  2:00 PM

Location:Androscoggin Community Room

Auburn Page Turners, Dec. 2

This month we will discuss Circe by Madeline Miller

In the house of Helios, a daughter is born. Circe is a strange child–not powerful, like her father, nor alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess the power of witchcraft. Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she crosses paths with the most famous figures in mythology. But there is danger. Circe finds herself pitted against one of the most vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods or the mortals she has come to love.

Date:Monday Dec 2, 2019

Time:12:30 PM  –  1:30 PM

Location:Local History Room

A Look Back Book Group, Dec. 6

Our November/December selection will be Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout. Please note special date!

At the edge of the continent, in the small town of Crosby, Maine, lives Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher who deplores the changes in her town and in the world at large but doesn’t always recognize the changes in those around her.

A Look Back is a new book group about old times! This year, in recognition of Auburn’s 150th Anniversary, we are reading books about Maine and New England history. 

New members are always welcome.

Date:Friday Dec 6, 2019Time:12:00 PM  –  1:00 PM

Location:Local History Room

Smartphone Basics, Nov. 15

Come learn from those who know. Join the 4-H Changemakers and learn some “Smartphone Basics.” The National 4-H Council and Microsoft are working together through the 4-H Tech Changemakers program to empower 4-H teens in 91 communities across 15 states to lead digital skills trainings, teach the value of digital tools and find technological solutions to real world problems. They call these tech-savvy and community-oriented young people 4-H Tech Changemakers and they will be here at the Auburn Public Library. 

Date:Friday Nov 15, 2019

Time:1:00 PM  –  2:00 PM

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