As long as we both shall live – Staff Review – Maddy

As long as we both shall live by JoAnn Cheney

Matt told park rangers his wife was dead- she fell off a high cliff when hiking into the river below. A rescue search ensues, but rangers are skeptical of what the outcome will be. But when a body turns up, it creates more questions than answers.

Matt’s first wife died under mysterious circumstances as well. Detectives Loren and Spengler have a lot of questions for Matt as they delve into the case and the couple’s past.

As long as we both shall live is a psychological thriller novel in which the author keeps readers guessing who did what and who’s guilty to the very end. Not everything or everyone is what they seem and the married couple in this story have much to hide. This book was a quick read and is good for those who enjoyed Girl on the Train and Gone Girl.

3 stars.

Evvie Drake Starts Over – Staff Review- Maddy

Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes

In a small coastal Maine town, Evvie Drake barely leaves her house. Her best friend Andy and most the town think her seclusion has to do with her husband’s death. Andy’s best friend Dean Tenney, a major league baseball pitcher in New York is struggling with the ‘yips’- he can’t throw straight anymore. Andy invites Dean to Maine, thinking the vacation and fresh air might do him some good. So Dean moves into Evvie’s apartment under the condition that he won’t ask about her husband and she won’t ask him about baseball. This doesn’t last long however, as the two become friends and help each other overcome their demons.

Evvie Drake Starts Over was a cute, fun read that was hard to put down. I enjoyed the relationship between the two main characters and how they helped each other through hard times.

4 stars.

Landline – Staff Review- Izzy

Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Landline by Rainbow Rowell is an engaging, funny, and reflective novel about a marriage gone wrong and a magic phone that could be the answer to everything. Georgie McCool loves her husband Neal, of course she does, and Neal loves her, no question. So then why does she find herself home alone and working over Christmastime while her husband and kids fly off to visit his family in Omaha without her? And why has her own family started to tiptoe around her like she is going through a divorce? As Georgie begins to unravel with worry that Neal is more than just his usual upset with her this time, she discovers something different about her landline phone in her old bedroom at her mom’s house – it connects her to Neal from before they got engaged. Staying up late and talking on the phone with her husband’s younger self, she begins to wonder if this is her second chance to make things right before they went wrong. But what does making things right even look like and what will it do to the life and family she has come to build? Read if you don’t mind a book that can bring you to tears and laughter simultaneously and if you ever wished you had a phone that could connect you to the past!

4 Stars

The Moroccan Girl – Staff Review – Maddy

The Moroccan Girl by Charles Cummings

For those looking for a quick read or that enjoy spy and espionage novels, give the Moroccan Girl a read. The story focuses on Kit Carradine, a writer of spy novels who is suddenly drawn into a real life spy scenario in which he is tasked by MI6 to look for a woman, Lara Bartok who has ties to the Resurrection, an international revolutionary group targeting political figures. Initially, all he has to do is make contact with Lara while at a literary festival in Morocco. However, Kit soon realizes he is in over his head and the situation is much more complicated. Kit must choose between aiding his country or keeping Lara Bartok alive at his own risk.

As I said, the Moroccan Girl is a quick easy read that transports readers into the world of spies and secrets, if only for a few days. 

3 stars fiction

Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination – Staff Review- Maddy

Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination by Brain Jay Jones

 Everyone knows and probably read books by Dr. Seuss growing up, but who is the man behind the legacy? Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel. Before he was known as a children’s author, Geisel drew political cartoons and catchy ads for materials such as bug repellant and education materials for soldiers during World War two. You may be surprised to learn how Dr. Seuss came to write childrens’ books or how he got his name, but I won’t tell. One thing is for sure, Dr. Seuss created a legacy and changed the way people thought about children’s literature for the better. Brian Jones did a great job with this biography, capturing all the details of Dr. Seuss’ life that made him the man he was while keeping readers engaged. 

4 stars biography 

Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth – Staff Review – Maddy

Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth by Ian MacGregor

During the Cold War, Checkpoint Charlie was one of the three entry points in the Berlin wall to cross West Germany into East Germany. Checkpoint Charlie was the gate specifically used by military personnel and gaining access from one side to the other was not easy, especially for East Berliners. MacGregor details the history of the military checkpoint and how dangerous relations were for all sides involved in guarding the barriers and access across the wall. He also uses first hand accounts from military personnel and civilians from the East and West. MacGregor does a great job in detailing all aspects of life during this time and showing readers how the story wasn’t black and white. 
For anyone interested in the Cold War, Berlin wall, or Germany immediately after World War Two, I recommend reading this book as it gives a good history of Checkpoint Charlie and an introduction to how the Berlin Wall affected life on both sides. 

4 stars non-fiction

Moths: A Complete Guide to Biology and Behavior – Staff Review – Terry

Moths: A Complete Guide to Biology and Behavior by David C. Lees and Alberto Zilli

Moths is a book about, well moths and their biology.  The writing of Moths is not terribly technical in most parts of the book, and where it does get techical it explains the science behind the subject in a way that is both relatable and scholarly.  I personally find this book to be a welcome introduction to those just wanting to learn about either moths in general or for those looking to research specific aspects of moth behavior or even if you just want to look at some wonderful and professional close up nature photography, this is the book for you.  I would give this book five stars out of five but I have to deduct one due to some editing issues with a few of the photographs in the book being incorrectly labeled or simply duplicated from other pages.  This issue aside, the book is overall a worthy read and excellent for the coming warm summer evenings that will bring many of these small friends to our backyards. 

4 stars

The Eleventh Trade – Staff Review – Corinna

The Eleventh Trade by Alyssa Hollingsworth

2019-2020 maine student book award list, available in book format on the cloud library.

The Eleventh Trade takes place in Boston Massachusetts where twelve year old Sam is living with his grandfather, after immigrating from Afghanistan. While in Sam’s possession, the instrument Sam’s grandfather uses to make a living is stolen. And thus the quest to find the rebab begins. As we follow Sam’s search for the instrument, he also begins to find friendship also the way. And in pieces we begin to learn what had happened to Sam and his family, and his journey to America.I decided to read this book to familiarise myself with as many of the maine student book awards I I could. I found that the book started off a little slow for me, but as Sam’s journey continued, I became more and more invested to see if Sam was able to get his grandfather’s rebab back, and to learn about their journey to Boston. Spoiler alert: I would suggest finishing this book with a box of tissues at hand. But in the good way, I think we all could use a happy ending right now. 

5  stars

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